Jewish Film Festival Preview, Part 1

Here are four films I’ve already seen that are coming to the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival.

A Indignation

Already screened at San Francisco International Film Festival.
Most coming of age movies are essentially optimistic. You know that the protagonist will come out alright. But in Indignation, you slowly begin to realize that, in the early 1950s, Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman) just might not find happiness. He has no good options, only bad ones. And he lacks the maturity to find the lesser evil. The son of a New Jersey kosher butcher, he does well academically but not socially in a Christian college in Ohio. And if he leaves college, the draft and the Korean War await. Based on a novel by Phillip Roth.

  • Rafael, Friday, August 5, 6:30. The film will also open a regular engagement in San Francisco the same day.

B+ The Last Laugh

Ferne Pearlstein’s documentary asks an interesting and difficult question: Can we joke about the Holocaust? Quick answer: Yes, if you’re Jewish, and if the joke is very funny. The professional comics interviewed include Sarah Silverman, Carl Reiner, his son Rob Reiner, David Steinberg, and Mel Brooks–the creator of The Producers has a lot to say on the subject. Auschwitz survivor Renee Firestone, not a professional but with a healthy sense of humor, deservedly gets more screen time than anyone else. Intriguing and funny while bringing up questions of remembrance, respect, and censorship.

The film has no connection to F. W. Murnau’s silent masterpiece, The Last Laugh.

  • Roda, Saturday, July 30, 7:10
  • Castro, Sunday, July 31, 2:55

B The Freedom to Marry

Already screened at Frameline. This documentary follows the struggle for marriage equality in both the courts and public opinion. As one would expect considering the outcome that we all know, it’s upbeat and inspiring. The problem is that it sticks almost exclusively to the last weeks before the Supreme Court decision. The years of struggle that preceded the big Washington moment are walked over quickly and without depth.

What makes this film Jewish? Some of the most important leaders in the movement, and thus the heroes of the story, are Jewish.

  • Castro, Friday, July 29, 3:50
  • Roda, Wednesday, August 3, 8:35

C+ The Tenth Man

Opening Night!
Ariel, an accountant living in New York, returns to his Buenos Aires home to help his Orthodox father’s Jewish charity. But his father (who is only a voice on the phone) keeps sending him on strange errands and wild-goose chases. Meanwhile a beautiful redhead–an beautiful and very religious redhead–seems to be spending a lot of time with Ariel. That potentially funny plot never really gets off the ground in this badly-paced, occasionally funny comedy.

I’ll be previewing more of these movies in the near future.