IndieFest Preview

I’ve managed to preview four films that will screen at next month’s IndieFest. Here’s what I thought of them, from "must see" to "must miss."

A Chocolate Strawberry Vanilla
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Imagine Milton from Office Space slowly turning into Travis Bickle. That’s pretty much what you get in this very black comedy from Australia. The main character has his own business–an ice cream truck–that brings him into contact with a lot of people. But he’s a very shy, lonely, and awkward man. He lives alone. He doesn’t have any real friends. He worships Clint Eastwood. He’s obsessed with a soap opera star. He spends most of his workday parked in a horrible location where he’s bullied by a very thuggish pimp. His cat just died, but he still puts food in the bowl every morning. He’s nearing a very dangerous boiling point. The humor drains away appropriately as darkness and violence takes over the movie. A remarkable, brutal, funny, and heartfelt little gem.

  • Roxie, Saturday, February 7, 7:15
  • Roxie, Tuesday, February 10, 9:30

B+ Beyond Clueless
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Charlie Lyne’s documentary examines the teenage thrills, terrors, and transitions through the looking glass of high school movies. Just about every feature film focusing on adolescents from the last 20 years makes at least a cameo appearance, from American Pie,  Election, Spider Man, Mean Girls, Pleasantville, Donnie Darko, and, of course, Clueless. The uncredited narrator goes into detail with a few movies–including Bubble Boy, Disturbing Behavior, and The Faculty–to examine issues like peer pressure, sexuality, and moving on with your life. Not particularly deep, but useful if you are, recently were, or parent a teenager. And certainly entertaining.

D- Jacky and the Kingdom of Women
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This French satire imagines a society of reverse sexism. The women are leaders and warriors. The men are sex objects and obedient husbands. It’s an effective way to highlight flaws in our culture, if not an original one (eight years ago I wrote and performed in a one-act play with the same theme). But two problems sink this attempt. First, the society in which it’s set–a combination of North Korea, the Islamic State, and horse worship–is too bizarre to make a satirical point about western society. There’s nothing to recognize. Second, it’s just not funny. My favorite moment was a chase; not because it made me laugh–it didn’t–but because it held the promise that the movie would soon be over. It didn’t even keep that promise.

D- For the Plasma
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Talk about a movie that doesn’t go anywhere. Two young women live in a house in rural, coastal Maine, where they’re supposed to check various cameras and sensors in the woods for early forest fires warnings. One of them has figured out a foolproof way to turn all this data into profitable stock market predictions. She’s getting checks for it, but she doesn’t seem to care. Neither does her companion. Neither did I. Both actresses are flat and dull. Almost nothing happens to them, and the few things that do don’t amount to anything. Even basic continuity is lacking; one scene ends with one woman locked in her bedroom and the other apparently unconscious in a ditch. In the next scene it’s as if nothing happened. I kept hoping it would turn into a slasher movie–and I don’t care much for slasher movies.

Disclaimer: When I viewed the movie, I noticed a mildly irritating visual stutter–as if one frame every second was repeated. I don’t know if this was a problem with the screener DVD or the movie itself. I decided to give the film the benefit of a doubt, which is why I gave it a D+ rather than an F.

  • Roxie, Sunday, February 8, 7:15
  • Roxie, Thursday, February 12, 7:15