Two Pre-code Crime Flix at Roxie Noir Festival: I Wake Up Dreaming

Saturday afternoon, I made my way to the Roxie to attend a program in the theater’s current Film Noir festival, I Wake Up Dreaming. Like most of the 13 programs on the festival’s schedule, it was a double bill (the rest are triple bills).

It was a fun afternoon, but not an exceptional one.

The movies both came out of the early 1930s, well before the mid-40s golden age of film noir . While they were both crime pictures with a thick layer of cynicism, they lacked the dark, impressionistic lighting that gave Film Noir its name.

On the other hand, they’re both pre-code. They could be sexier, and even more cynical, than anything Hollywood would put out in the classic Noir period.

The very nature of the event made the movies more entertaining than they would otherwise be. The auditorium was reasonably crowded, and the audience responded enthusiastically to every joke–intentional or not.

So let’s get to the movies:

C+ Love is a Racket

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Douglas Fairbanks Jr. plays a reporter on the Broadway beat. He actively wants to avoid the crime beat for reasons of personal safety, and he’s in love with a struggling actress (Frances Dee). That spells trouble. She’s written some bad checks, and a powerful and ruthless gangster wants to add her to his conquests. The story isn’t much, But a fast pace, occasional witty dialog, and an ending as cynical as they come keeps it reasonably entertaining. It was directed by the great William Wellman, but I wouldn’t count it amongst his masterpieces.

C+ Ladies They Talk About

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Before seeing this 1933 women-in-prison drama, I had no idea that the lady’s section in San Quentin had such an excellent beauty parlor. While some of the women appeared to have lost all interest in their personal appearances, most of them sported perfect hair and makeup. Fortunately, the extremely silly story about a beautiful bank robber and the man who wants to reform her stars Barbara Stanwyck. Her very presence on screen can make up for a lot of back writing. The always-upbeat Lillian Roth plays her best friend behind bars, and even gets to sing a song.

Now that I think of it, I don’t believe I’ve ever seen Stanwyck play a law-abiding citizen.

I’d seen this one before, some years ago, but I’d forgotten about it.

This year, all of the films screened come from the Warner Archive Collection, and Warner has made them available to the Roxie only on DVD. On a really big screen like the  Castro‘s, that would be a disaster. But at the modestly-sized Roxie, the two films I saw looked acceptable–even if they were a bit soft. They looked at least as good as 16mm prints. Blu-ray, DCP, or 35mm would have looked a lot better. But for these lesser-known titles, they’re just not available.

I Wake Up Dreaming runs through May 25.