Return to the UC Theatre

Thursday night, I attended an open house at the UC Theatre, once my shrine to the art and joy of cinema. As I mentioned back in April, The Berkeley Music Group plans to reopen the UC next year as a music venue.

I was surprised by how much the theater hasn’t changed. It was in pretty bad condition, but the walls, the surround speakers, and the seats were as they always were.

image

Excuse the image quality of the picture above. The camera in my phone doesn’t do well with low light conditions.

Unfortunately, we were only allowed in the lobby and in a small corner of the back of the auditorium. If I had been able to walk down the aisle to the third row center, where I had spent so much time, I might have cried.

On the other hand, from what I could see, the seats in the front center section have been removed.

Of course I’d rather the UC be re-opened as a repertory house–the Castro East, so to speak. But alas, that’s not where the money is. Hopefully, they’ll install good projectors and use it as a movie venue as well as a musical one.

The Magick Lantern–waiting to be reborn

The Magick Lantern, a tiny theater in Point Richmond, opened early this year, showing recent arthouse fare on weekends and classics Thursday night. I added it my Theaters link list immediately, but I never made it there to see a movie.

Then, in October, before I had a chance to visit the Magick Latern, it closed. Go to the website now, a simple wepage will tell you that

THE MAGICK LANTERN IS

CLOSED

WE ANTICIPATE RE-OPENING
VERY SOON UNDER DIFFERENT
AND BETTER CIRCUMSTANCES!
IF YOU’RE ON OUR EMAIL LIST,
WE’LL KEEP YOU POSTED ON
ALL THE DETAILS!

On Saturday afternoon, the Magick Lantern held an open house, and I finally got to visit.

Point Richmond is one of those corners of the Bay Area that feel like a small town. A handful of retail streets surround a city square, on the edge of hills.

The Magick Lantern is in the back of a modest building. The auditorium, such as it is, looks more like a small apartment living room without windows. I’d guess that it could sit 40 at most.

Apparently it looked and felt more like a theater in the months it was running. But the previous owner took the seats, the tiered platform for those seats, and the equipment when he left.

A group of determined people have formed a non-profit to bring the theater back. They’re raising money to buy the seats, the platforms, a screen, a concession stand, and a projector and sound system.

Even if they could afford it (and they can’t), I don’t think they’d have the room for a professional, DCI-compatible projector. But a modest, 1080p home projection system and a Blu-ray player would be fine in that small space. They wouldn’t be able to play new movies, but they could play almost new ones and a lot of classics.

If you want to help, send your check to:

Magick Lantern
115 Buena Vista Ave.
Richmond, CA 94801

You can also contact them at magick-lantern@att.net.

December at the Castro

Have you seen the Castro’s Coming Soon page? Some interesting stuff coming up in December.

Regular readers know that I disapprove of all the brouhaha over Gone with the Wind’s 75th anniversary. I find it upsetting that a film so racist can be a beloved classic in the 21st century, with very little discussion of what the picture is saying. The Castro has joined the theaters screening this epic apology for slavery, but they did something interesting that I like. For December 28, they’ve put it on a double bill with Django Unchained. I don’t care much for Tarantino’s spaghetti western version of the old south,  but at least it’s on the side of freedom.

gone with django

On the other hand, since Gone with the Wind runs 238 minutes, it’s hard to imagine it on a double bill with anything. At 165 minutes, Django Unchained is hardly short, either. The total approaches seven hours.

I supposed they couldn’t get 12 Years a Slave, which is much better than Django, looks at slavery from a very real perspective, and is about half an hour shorter.

Also on the schedule:

  • December 9: An Evening with Jared Diamond. I loved Guns, Germs, and Steel, and liked Collapse a lot too. Should be an interesting talk.
  • December 12: Who Framed Roger Rabbit. I saw it when it was new, and loved it. Don’t know if I’d love it now. On a double bill with Ed Wood, which I also saw when it was new. I was disappointed in that one.
  • December 21: Die Hard. One of the best action flicks ever. I’ve seen it on Laserdisc and DVD, and own it on Blu-ray, but I’ve never seen it on the big screen. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to see this screening. On a double bill with Scrooged, which I understand isn’t very good.
  • December 22: It’s a Wonderful Life. Yes, it’s corny, but it’s a wonderful movie.
  • December 26: Bogart Double bill. Two of his best and best known: Casablanca and The African Queen.
  • December 29: Two big, large-format roadshow musicals from the 1960s, My Fair Lady and The Music Man. I prefer Pygmalion without the songs, but I do like The Music Man.

September at the Castro

Have you checked out the Castro‘s Coming Soon page? Here you’ll find the September schedule–sans links to more details. A few events worth noting:

  • The month begins with the end of a three-day run for Lawrence of Arabia, which should look wonderful with the Castro’s new 4K projector. August 30-September 1.
  • Not surprisingly, Robin Williams gets two double bills (the first two Sundays of the month, plus another mid-week appearance). The movies are Good Will Hunting, Dead Poets Society, The Fisher King, Good Morning Vietnam, and The World According to Garp.
  • If…, a favorite from my youth, plays Wednesday, 9/10 on a double bill with The Chocolate War. I guess that works, but everyone who went to the movies in the 70s knows that If… belongs on a double bill with O Lucky Man, which is sort of a sequel.
  • The very next day, they’re screening the wonderful Dog Day Afternoon, with something called The Dog. Maybe they should bring in Rin Tin Tin.
  • Antonioni’s great study of pollution and madness, Red Desert, plays a double bill with Mickey One on Wednesday, September 24.
  • My favorite Samuel Fuller flick, Pickup on South Street, plays Sunday, 9/28, with Park Row and something called A Fuller Life.
  • Stepping into early October, we have Jaws 3-D. I’ve never seen it, and like all of the Jaws sequels, it has a horrible reputation. They shot it in 3D (very rare in those days) because back then calling a movie Title of a Past Hit 3 was considered a confession that it was a really lousy picture.

The Castro now has 4K projection

Top technology has been an important part of the Castro‘s appeal for a long time. The theater was, I believe, the first rep house to get Dolby stereo, digital sound, and DCP-compatible digital projection. I believe it’s the only local rep house that can project 70mm film, and one of only two that can handle 50’s-style,dual-strip 3D.

And now they’ve added the digital equivalent of 70mm film–4K projection. 4K projects four times the resolution of standard 2K. I’ve never seen a side-by-side comparison of the two, and I’ve heard conflicting opinions from experts on this. But I suspect that the difference is significant, especially if the film was shot in a large format and if you’re sitting close to the screen (as I usually do).

Last year, I was delighted to learn that the Pacific Film Archive had a new, 4K projector. But the PFA has a small screen–too small for an immersive experience. Not so with the Castro’s large screen.

Back in May, I wrote about a stuck pixel that marred the Castro’s digital screenings. At the end of that article, I disclosed that I had "emailed my Castro press contact about this issue, but he could only give me information off the record." Now I can tell you what he told me: that they might simply fix the problem, or they might instead upgrade to 4K projection. Today, he revealed that "We have completed installation of the 4K projector."

I am, of course, delighted.

When can you see the new projector in action? The Castro will screen Double Indemnity off a DCP tomorrow night, but that one is probably 2K (although I honestly don’t know). However, they’ll be screening The Leopard in 4K on August 24, and Lawrence of Arabia that way August 30 and September 1. Both films were shot in large film formats (Technirama and Super Panavision 70 respectively). I suspect that both films will look great in 4K projection.

The UC Theatre to be born again (but not as a movie house)

According to a Berkeleyside article by  Frances Dinkelspiel, the UC Theatre is coming back to life. That’s the good news. The bad new–admittedly from my personal perspective–is that it’s not going to show movies.

For 25 years, the UC Theatre was my favorite temple to the cinematic arts. I saw hundreds of films there, from the great masterpieces to the most ludicrous junk. There were years where I visited the UC three or four times a week. See The UC Theatre: A Memory for details.

The UC closed in 2001. This summer, the Berkeley Music Group will start renovating it. They have a website and everything, and plan to turn it into a music venue. David Mayeri, the man behind the project, is describing his vision as a Berkeley version of the Fillmore.

That all sounds well and good. I love live music–I’m even married to a musician. But I would have rather seen it turned into the Berkeley version of the Castro.

Well, maybe they’ll show an occasional movie. After all, that’s what the building was designed for.

Film, Digital, and the Current Castro Calendar

Early every month, I visit the Castro‘s Playlist page to see which classics they’re showing digitally rather than on film. 

And no, I don’t do this to get angry. I love film, but I also love DCP (the digital standard that’s replaced film in theaters). It’s more a matter of curiosity.

As I understand it, the Castro’s management usually screens classics on film if it’s available. But I’m sure there are exceptions. For one thing, DCP cuts shipping costs significantly. If a classic has undergone a major digital restoration, DCP will always look superior. It often looks superior even without the restoration, but not always.

Purists who disagree with me will be glad to know that 35mm has the upper-hand on the current calendar–at least if we ignore new films. But not by much. Over the course of April and early May, the Castro will screen 19 35mm prints, and only 14 DCPs of older movies.

A few noteworthy selections:

The Red Shoes (April 10, DCP): This ballet melodrama uses the 3-strip Technicolor format better than any other film I’ve seen, so you want to see it with the best image quality. It was recently restored digitally, so I feel safe to say that DCP is the right choice.

Groundhog Day (April 11, 35mm): I know for a fact that there’s a DCP for this title. I’m guessing that the Castro had both options and picked 35mm.

Ben-Hur (April 13, DCP): This 1959 epic was originally shown in a special, anamorphic 70mm format. Since it’s unlikely to be shown that way again, DCP is the best choice. However, this is the sort of movie that makes me wish that the Castro had a 4K digital projector–which does better for large-format films.

Sorcerer (April 17, DCP): This remake of The Wages of Fear has just been restored. Of course it’s now digital.

Johnny Guitar (April 23, DCP): I’m really glad they’ve bothered to digitize this gem, which deserves to be better known. I hope they did a good job.

Emperor of the North (April 27, 35mm): I haven’t seen this film, but the Castro is promising an archival print. I’ll generally  take that over a DCP.

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (May 3, DCP): This was shot in the same very wide, large-film format as Ben-Hur, and should ideally be projected the same way. Some years back, United Artists struck an anamorphic 70mm print, and the Castro screened it, using special projection lenses supplied for the engagement. However, that wasn’t the complete movie. The original cut has now been digitally restored, and is thus on DCP. For what it’s worth, I loved this movie when I was ten; I can’t stand it now.

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