Left in the Dark at the PFA

I’m trying to get back into the swing of things here, both with movie-going and blogging about movie-going. Saturday night I took the plunge.

I started the evening at the Pacific Film Archive for Left in the Dark: Portraits of San Francisco Movie Theatres. I’ve mentioned other events around the book Left in the Dark before (here and here), but this time I finally got to one of them.

Don’t expect a linear history of San Francisco movie theaters, here. The photographs bycopertina-left-in-the-dark X CIANO a filo.indd R.A. McBride are the real stars of the book. These beautiful yet often heart-breaking pictures show theaters in their glory and when the glory has long faded. The photos are supported by essays from various authors, each describing one aspect or another of the City’s cinematic history and culture. For instance, Chi-hui Yang discusses Chinatown theaters, and Eddie Muller covers—what else–the Noir side of things.

One slight digression: In order to get the book published, its true auteurs, editor Julie Lindow and photographer R.A. McBride, had to buy 1,000 copies. So if you want to buy a copy, do them a favor and make the  purchase from their web site. Yes, it costs a little more, but you’ll be supporting the arts.

Speaking over a slideshow, McBride and Katherine Petrin discussed the history of some of theaters involved, including the still-beautiful Castro, the decrepit New Mission (I hadn’t even heard of that one), and the now-gone Coronet. McBride showed several slides of the Coronet’s demolition.

After a brief Q&A, author and UC grad student Laura Horak took the podium to read some excerpts. She started with the section she wrote with Gary Meyer—basically Meyer’s professional autobiography (the section’s byline reads "Gary Meyer with Laura Horak”). It was strange listening to her talk in first person as Gary—especially since he was sitting right next to me. From there she went on to midnight movies (Elisabeth Houseman with Joshua Grannell wrote that chapter), then to the subject of her dissertation: cross-dressing in silent films.

By that time, a program that was supposed to run 60 minutes had passed 90. Since I had other plans for the evening, I had to leave. Unfortunately, I utterly failed to leave my second-row seat discretely. Then I realized that I had left my umbrella in my seat, and utterly failed at leaving discretely again. I feel pretty bad about that.

My plans? Dinner with my wife and on to the Shattuck to see Nowhere Boy. I’ve got another post coming about that.

11/1: I have altered this post to correct an error.  I had incorrectly credited editor Julie Lindow, not Katherine Petrin, with co-presenting the first presentation.

What’s Screening: October 29 – November 4

Festival news: Berlin & Beyond continues through Saturday. United Nations Association Film Festival ends Sunday. French Cinema Now continues through Wednesday.

A- Bonnie and Clyde, Castro, Wednesday. This low-budget gangster movie, produced by and starring Warren Beatty , hit a nerve with young audiences in 1967 and became one of the big surprise hits of the year. Shocking in its time for its violence and sexual frankness (matching a horny Bonnie with an impotent Clyde), it still hits below the belt today. Here the historical bank robbers of yesterday become alienated youth, glamorous celebrities, good kids who made a bad decision, selfish jerks, and tragic heroes with a sealed fate. And we root for them, fear for them, and suffer with them every step of the way—even while we’re horrified by their actions. On a double bill with Night Movies, which I’ve never seen and have no opinion about.

A The Kids are All Right, Red Vic, Tuesday and Wednesday. Lisa Cholodenko’s serious comedy  about a middle-aged lesbian couple, their kidsallrightteenage children, and the very heterosexual man who ambles his way into their lives could just be the best film of 2010. Few movies have caught with such fidelity the love, stress, joy, and day-to-day battles of an endangered but not altogether lost marriage. And even fewer have done it in such a funny, sexy, entertaining package. But why Cholodenko picked a title that would be easily confused with the Who rockumentary is beyond me.

C+ Charlie Chan at the Opera, Stanford, Saturday through Monday. The only Charlie Chan movie I’ve ever seen (I picked this one because someone told me it was the best of the lot) is a pretty typical B mystery from the 1930s. Aside from its moderate entertainment value, its chief interest is its treatment of Chinese Americans, shocking by today’s standards (the title character is played by Euro-American Warner Oland in heavy makeup and heavier accent) but progressive for its time. After all, the Chinese hero is smarter and kinder than any white person on screen. The fact that his sidekick—his grown son—appears far more integrated into American culture suggests the sort of immigrant experience familiar to white minorities at that time (the son is played by a Chinese-American actor, Keye Luke). And William Demarest plays bigotry for laughs as a cop who rants about the “Chinks” while Chan solves the murder.

A- Howl, Castro, Thursday. What did you expect–a howlconventional biopic? Would that do justice to the Allen Ginsberg epic poem with which the film shares its title? Like the poem, Howl is challenging, cutting-edge, and unconventional. By weaving together an extended interview with Ginsberg (James Franco), scenes from publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s obscenity trial, and an illustrated reading of the titular poem, Howl gives an overview of Ginsberg’s early life, celebrates the work itself, and cherishes the freedom that made the poem possible. I’ve never read Ginsberg’s poem; this film makes me want to read it. And you might want to read my full review.

Macbeth (1948), Pacific Film Archive, Friday, 9:30. I saw Orson Welles’ version of Shakespeare’s shortest tragedy decades ago at the PFA, and found it laughably bad. The characters spoke in a Scottish brogue that sounded both fake and impenetrable, and the production values were so cheap that at one point actors cast their shadow upon the sky. But maybe I’m remembering it wrong. Part of the PFA’s Shakespeare on Screen series.

Miracle in Milan, Pacific Film Archive, Saturday, 4:00. I haven’t seen Vittorio De Sica’s neo-realistic fantasy/comedy in a very long time, but I remember it fondly. And I’m pretty sure my oxymoronic description is accurate. Visually, it’s as bleak and poverty-centered as The Bicycle Thief, but its playful fable of a story seems closer to Peter Pan. Part of the series Days of Glory: Revisiting Italian Neorealism.

Finally, we’ve got several Halloween specials happening:

What’s Screening: October 22 – 28

A lot of festivals this week:

King Lear, Pacific Film Archive, Saturday, 8:30. I was so delighted to discover Grigori  Kozintsev’s adaptation of russian_learShakespeare’s most depressing tragedy on the current PFA schedule, then so disappointed to discover that I couldn’t possibly attend. I saw this film at the UC Theater (of blessed memory) around 1976, then again at the PFA in the early ‘80s. Here’s what I remember: Widescreen black and white makes the perfect medium for capturing Lear’s desolate wilderness. The play’s beautiful poetry works extremely well when presented as subtitles (the spoken, Russian dialog was translated by Boris Pasternak). At the time, I thought it was the best Shakespeare adaptation I’d ever seen.

Creature Features Lives!, Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, Sunday, 4:00. If you lived in the Bay Area before the advent of home video, you remember Creature Features—channel 2’s late Friday night thing. And if you’ve been reading this blog for at least two weeks, you’ve read that sentence before and know that this is the second Creature Features tribute this month. The museum will screen a 1973 Creature Features show—complete with commercials. Original host Bob Wilkins will be onscreen, and replacement host John Stanley, along with Tom Wyrsch (no, I don’t know who that is) will be there in person for Q&A.

The Bicycle Thief, Pacific Film Archive, Friday, bikethief4[1]7:00, Saturday, 6:00. I haven’t seen Vittorio De Sica’s neo-realism masterpiece in at least 20 years, so I’m officially unqualified to recommend it. But I remember something stunning and moving, and probably relevant to our economically uncertain times. Part of the series Days of Glory: Revisiting Italian Neorealism.

B Mantrap, Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, Saturday, 7:30. Here’s your chance to discover why Clara Bow was such a huge star in the 1920’s. Sexy, funny, and bubbling with energy, she plays a big-city manicurist who on a whim marries a man from the Canadian wilderness. Her new  husband is played by Ernest Torrence—definitely several notches below her on the physical attraction scale. Needless to say, she flirts with everything in pants. The name Mantrap refers to the very small town where most of the movie is set, but it might as well refer to Bow’s character, or Bow herself. Not a great work of silent comedy, but a fun date movie. With Bruce Loeb on piano.

A- Howl, Roxie, Saturday and Sunday, 3:00. What did you expect–a howlconventional biopic? Would that do justice to the Allen Ginsberg epic poem with which the film shares its title? Like the poem, Howl is challenging, cutting-edge, and unconventional. By weaving together an extended interview with Ginsberg (James Franco), scenes from publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s obscenity trial, and an illustrated reading of the titular poem, Howl gives an overview of Ginsberg’s early life, celebrates the work itself, and cherishes the freedom that made the poem possible. I’ve never read Ginsberg’s poem; this film makes me want to read it. And you might want to read my full review.

B+ Safety Last, Pacific Film Archive, Thursday, 7:00. Harold Lloyd’s iconic image, hanging from a large clock high over a city street, comes from this boy-makes-good-by-risking-his- neck fairytale. Lloyd made better pictures, but even mediocre Lloyd is damn funny. And when he starts climbing that building, the laughs–and thrills–don’t stop. With the Lloyd short “Never Weaken,” which laid the groundwork for Safety Last. Introduced by Merrill Schleier, author of Skyscraper Cinema: Architecture and Gender in American Film, and accompanied on piano by Judith Rosenberg.

B+ Winter’s Bone, Red Vic, Friday and Saturday. This may be the slowest mystery/thriller ever made, and that doesn’t hurt itwintersbone a bit. With  her father gone and her mother hopeless, teenager Ree (Jennifer Lawrence) has become the responsible caregiver for her younger siblings in their ramshackle home in the Ozark back woods. But things get worse when the sheriff visits. Her father has jumped bail, and unless he’s found in seven days, they lose the property. You’ll never easily dismiss these people as  “hillbillies” again.

Silent Film News

Three exciting Bay Aread silent film events coming up that I just had to tell you about.

Sunday, October 17: This one doesn’t even require you to leave the house. In a segment on this Sunday’s 60 Minutes (CBS, 7:00), Morley Safer will interview the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum’s own David Kiehn. (Yes, I know, the interview has already happened. It will merely be broadcast at that time.) The subject will be a very old film of San Francisco’s Market Street, which Kiehn has recently dated as having been shot on April 14, 1906—just four days before the earthquake. The TV crew did some filming in Niles, and we may see some of the museum on the show.

Sunday, November 14: Those of you who have followed San Francisco silent film presentation for a long time may remember the Club Foot Orchestra. This ensemble created their own unique accompaniment to a number of silent features, mostly German expressionistic classics like Nosferatu and Metropolis. But they also did Sherlock Jr., and their spirited but controversial score is on the DVD.  They’re returning to the Bay Area silent movie scene next month with four performances at the Castro. (No Metropolis, though.)

Thursday, December 7: Although not as popular as the works of Keaton or Murnau, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 period drama The Passion of Joan of Arc carries a high reputation as one of the great works of the medium. (I saw it once, about 10 years ago, on DVD, and was considerably impressed.) Richard Einhorn’s composition Voices of Light is both a score for Dreyer’s film and a respected piece of music in its own right. The film and the music will come together at Oakland’s Paramount Theater, with a 22-piece orchestra and a 200-voice chorus. Tickets are already on sale.

What’s Screening: October 15 – 21

The Mill Valley Film Festival closes Sunday, without my getting a chance to attend anything. The Arab Film Festival continues throughout this week. Docfest opens tonight, starting a two-week run. And Global Lens 2010 opens Tuesday.

A The Kids are All Right,Castro, Thursday. Lisa Cholodenko’s serious comedy  about a middle-aged lesbian couple, their kidsallrightteenage children, and the very heterosexual man who ambles his way into their lives could just be the best film of 2010. Few movies have caught with such fidelity the love, stress, joy, and day-to-day battles of an endangered but not altogether lost marriage. And even fewer have done it in such a funny, sexy, entertaining package. But why Cholodenko picked a title that would be easily confused with the Who rockumentary is beyond me.

B+ Winter’s Bone, Red Vic, Thursday (and continuing through the following Saturday). This may be the slowest mystery/thriller ever made, and that doesn’t hurt it wintersbonea bit. With  her father gone and her mother hopeless, teenager Ree (Jennifer Lawrence) has become the responsible caregiver for her younger siblings in their ramshackle home in the Ozark back woods. But things get worse when the sheriff visits. Her father has jumped bail, and unless he’s found in seven days, they lose the property. You’ll never easily dismiss these people as  “hillbillies” again.

Home Movie Day Film Check-In and Screening, Pacific Film Archive, Saturday, 11:00am (check-in) and 1:00 (screening). Not all movies are made by professionals. Here’s your chance to get your home movies checked by an archivist, then screened for an audience. Or, you can just pay admission and see other people’s home movies.

Left in the Dark Celebration, Balboa, 7:00. Gary Meyer’s theater will celebrate R.Acopertina-left-in-the-dark X CIANO a filo.indd. McBride’s new large-format book about San Francisco Movie Theatres with several of the book’s authors (including Meyer). Other festivities promised include sing-a-longs, prizes, a photo exhibit in the lobby, and, of course, movies. The short films promised include D.W. Griffith’s special effects comedy “Those Awful Hats,” “Becall to Arms,” and “Movie Pests.” I’m not sure, but I think all of these are set in movie theaters.

A+ Notorious, Stanford, Saturday through Monday. One of Hitchcock’s best. In ordernotorious to prove her patriotism, scandal-ridden Ingrid Bergman seduces, beds, and marries Claude Rains’ Nazi industrialist, while true love Cary Grant grimly watches. Sexy, romantic, thought-provoking, and scary enough to shorten your fingernails. On a double bill with Lubitsch’s World War II comedy, To Be or Not to Be, which I haven’t seen in a very long time but I remember really liking.

Miracle in Milan, Pacific Film Archive, Friday, 9:10. I haven’t seen Vittorio De Sica’s neo-realistic fantasy/comedy in a very long time, but I remember it fondly. And I’m pretty sure my oxymoronic description is accurate. Visually, it’s as bleak and poverty-centered as The Bicycle Thief, but its playful fable of a story seems closer to Peter Pan. Part of the series Days of Glory: Revisiting Italian Neorealism.

A Metropolis, Pacific Film Archive, Tuesday, 7:00; Rafael, Tuesday through Friday. The first important science fiction feature film still strikes a considerable visual punch, and with the latest restoration, tells a compelling story, as well. The images–workers in a hellish underground factory, the wealthy at play, a robot brought to life in the form of a beautiful woman–are a permanent part of our collective memory. Even people who haven’t seen Metropolis know them through the countless films it has influenced. Recently-discovered footage elevates the story of a clash between workers and aristocrats from trite melodrama to a tale of real people in an artificial world. Read my longer report. Digitally projected. The Rafael will play the recorded original score, but the PFA will have piano accompaniment by Judith Rosenberg.

D Romeo + Juliet, Pacific Film Archive, Sunday, 4:00. Updating Shakespeare to the present (or the more recent past) has been all the rage for the last 20 years or so. Sometimes it works brilliantly, but not so in Baz Luhrmann’s ultra-frantic take on the Bard’s most famous romantic tragedy. Set in a modern-day “Verona Beach,” this R&J uses its setting as a gimmick, distracting us from the story rather than enhancing it. For instance, we see a close-up of a very modern rifle with the brand name Sword before Benvolio cries out “Put up your swords.” On the rare occasions when the settings don’t distract, the flashy editing does. A lot of great Shakespeare films were made in the 1990s, but oddly, this is the only one from that decade in the PFA’s current Shakespeare on Screen series.

B The Big Lebowski, United Artists Berkeley, Thursday, 8:00. Critics originally big_lebowski[1] panned this Coen Brothers gem as a disappointing follow-up to the Coen’s previous endeavor, Fargo. Well, it isn’t as good as the Coen’s masterpiece, but it’s still one hell of a funny movie. It’s also built quite a cult following; The Big Lebowski has probably played more Bay Area one-night stands in the years I’ve been maintaining this site than than any three other movies put together.

What’s Screening: October 8 – 14

The Mill Valley Film Festival, which opened last night, runs through this week and into the next. I’ve placed festival events at the end of this newsletter. And the Arab Film Festival opens Thursday at the Castro before moving to less grand locations around the bay.

Left in the Dark Book Events. Photographer R.A. McBride’s new large-format book Left incopertina-left-in-the-dark X CIANO a filo.indd the Dark: Portraits San Francisco Movie Theatres celebrates the Bay Area’s film presentation history. Three local events help launch the book this week. First, there’s a party with a full bar, exhibition, and continuous slide show at Space Gallery (Sunday, 6:00 to midnight). Next…well, what San Francisco-themed literary release is complete without a book signing at City Lights (Tuesday, 7:00). Finally, there will be a slide show presentation at SF Camerawork (Wednesday, reception at 5:00; slide show at 7:00).

A Dr. Strangelove, Red Vic, Wednesday and Thursday. We like to look back at earlier  decades as simpler, less fearful times, but Stanley Kubrick’s “nightmare comedy” reminds you just how scary things once were. Thank heaven we no longer have idiots like those running the country! It’s also very funny.

A- Throne of Blood, Pacific Film Archive, Saturday, 6:00. Kurosawathroneblood stands Shakespeare on his head with this haunting, noh- and kabuki-inspired loose adaptation of Macbeth.Toshiro Mifune gives an over-the-top but still effective performance as the military officer tempted by his wife (Isuzu Yamada) into murdering his lord. The finale–which is far more democratic than anything Shakespeare ever dared–is one of the great action sequences ever. Read my Kurosawa Diary entry. Part of the PFA’s Shakespeare on Screen series.

Watch Horror Films! Keep America Strong!, Balboa, Tuesday, 7:00. If you lived in the Bay Area before the advent of home video, you remember Creature Features—channel 2’s late Friday night thing. Host John Stanley (who replaced Bob Wilkins as the show’s host) and Ernie Fosselius (of Hardware Wars fame) will be on hand live to celebrate the program.

C Rosemary’s Baby, Cerrito, Thursday. Some things are scarier than Woody rosemarysbaby_picAllen.Roman Polanski’s first American film barely works. Mia Farrow looks fidgety and nervous as a pregnant wife who slowly begins to suspect that she’s carrying the devil’s spawn, and that everyone she thought she could trust is in on it. Slow enough to let you see what’s coming a mile off, it never quite builds the sense of dread that the material, and the director, were capable of bringing to it. This month’s Cerrito Classics entry.

B Donnie Darko, Red Vic, Friday and Saturday. How many alienated-teenager-in- suburbia-time-travel-science-fantasy comedies can you name? Okay, there’s Back to the Future and its sequels, but add the adjectives horrific and surreal to that description, and Donnie Darko stands alone. And how many alienated movie teenagers have to deal with a slick self-help guru and a six-foot rabbit named Frank (think Harvey, only vicious). It’s not entirely clear what’s going on in this strange movie, but that just adds to the fun.

Mill Valley Film Festival

A- The Empire Strikes Back, Century Cinema, Corte Madera, Tuesday, 6:30. In honor of the second (and in most people’s view, best) Star Wars movie’s 30th anniversary, the festival will be screening…what I assume is the 1997 altered version (the festival describes it as a digital restoration). If they were playing the original, I’d give it an A+. Even so, the chance to see it on the big screen is tempting, and I couldn’t think of a better screen to see it in than the giant, curved one in Corte Madera. Now if only Lucas would screen a vintage 70mm print from the original release.

A The King’s Speech, Rafael, Saturday, 12:15. George VI (the Duke of York through much of the film, and kingsspeechBertie to his family) doesn’t want to live in the limelight. But fate forces that job onto the shy, reluctant man with a very bad stammer. Terrified, he turns to Australian immigrant Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush at his most impish) for help with his speech impediment. The relationship doesn’t start well. Logue begins with asking him personal questions, telling him not to smoke, and insisting they be on a first-name basis. For a man raised to believe in the importance of formal ceremonies meant to elevate his family above everyone else, this commoner’s disregard for tradition and class structure is shocking and confusing. And for the audience, it’s hilarious. While not quite a comedy, The King’s Speech manages to deliver far more laughs than the average drama, capturing the conflicts and absurdities of modern monarchies with grace, humor, and a fine rebellious streak.

The Tempest, Rafael, Sunday, 3:00. I haven’t seen it, but a version of Shakespeare’s almost-final play, directed by Julie Taymor and starring Helen Mirren sure sounds tempting.

Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff, Sequoia Theatre – Mill Valley, Thursday, 6:00. Another I haven’t seen. But Cardiff was a great cinematographer, and a master of early Technicolor. Should be interesting.

Newsletter Addendum: Mill Valley Film Festival

As I mentioned a while back, other responsibilities have pushed Bayflicks further back on my priorities list. That’s the only excuse I can think of this oversight.

In last week’s newsletter, I completely forgot to mention the opening of the Mill Valley Film Festival Thursday night. Nor did I post anything on the opening film, which I saw at a press screening.

So the following paragraph should have been in last week’s newsletter:

A The King’s Speech, Rafael, Thursday, 7:00. George VI (the Duke of York through much of the film, and kingsspeechBertie to his family) doesn’t want to live in the limelight. But fate forces that job onto the shy, reluctant man with a very bad stammer. Terrified, he turns to Australian immigrant Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush at his most impish) for help with his speech impediment. The relationship doesn’t start well. Logue begins with asking him personal questions, telling him not to smoke, and insisting they be on a first-name basis. For a man raised to believe in the importance of formal ceremonies meant to elevate his family above everyone else, this commoner’s disregard for tradition and class structure is shocking and confusing. And for the audience, hilarious. While not quite a comedy, The King’s Speech manages to deliver far more laughs than the average drama, capturing the conflicts and absurdities of modern monarchies with grace, humor, and a fine rebellious streak.

What’s Screening: October 1 – 7

A American Splendor, Pacific Film Archive, Saturday, 8:30. Directors Shari Springer  Berman and Robert Pulcini mix biopic and documentary methods to tell the story of GraphicNovel_AmericanSplendor[1]Harvey Pekar, a frustrated, angry, and intelligent man who found modest fame but little fortune as the writer (but not the illustrator) of a series of biographic comic books. For most of the film, Paul Giamatti plays Pekar and Hope Davis plays his wife, Joyce Brabner. But the real Pekar and Brabner also appear in the film, discussing the actual events and their cinematic recreation. And yes, this strange misplacement works, in large part because Pekar is as great a subject as Giamatti is an actor, and both have the same strange, unattractive charisma. Part of the series Drawn from Life: The Graphic Novel on Film.

Sesame Street at 40: Milestones on the Street, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Friday and Saturday. Who doesn’t have fond memories of Sesame Street? True, I’m too old to have experienced it as a member of its target audience, but I watched it with my son on a regular basis. This best-of compilation (I hope it has “Born to Add”) starts a month-long series More Muppet™ Magic: Jim Henson’s Legacy.

B+ Fresh, Rafael, Red Vic, Berkeley Oaks, opens Friday. Not so much about the problem of corporate factory farms as about the solution, Fresh spends most of its fresh_allen[1] short, 72-minute runtime introducing us to farmers, distributors, and supermarket managers who are making a difference. Farmers like Will Allen and Joel Salatin (pictured here) work with nature rather than fight it to produce the food they eat and sell. We also meet experts like Michael Pollan, author of Food Rules and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, who explains the problems of mass farming and how the nutritional quality of produce has dropped in recent decades. Yes, it’s another left-wing, didactic, political documentary that almost no one will see who doesn’t already agree with it’s point of view. That’s too bad, not only because the point of view needs to be heard, but because it’s an enjoyable, informative, and entertaining film. Read my full review. Note: The Red Vic engagement runs only through Thursday.

The Incredible Shrinking Man, The Presidio of San Francisco, Saturday, 7:00. After being exposed to really bad stuff in the environment, Scott Carey begins to slowly shrink. At first he’s just a little, um, small for his wife. Then his cat begins to relate to him as lunch. Additional existential threats as he continues to shrink include a huge spider and questions about the nature of existence, itself. At least, that’s how I remember this 1957 sci-fi epic, which I haven’t seen since college. I don’t know if I’d find it so profound now.

A+ Hitchcock/Grace Kelly Double Bill: Rear Window & Dial M for Murder, Castro, Friday. Rear Window represents Alfred Hitchcock at his absolute best. James Stewart is riveting as a news photographer temporarilyrearwindow_thumb[1] confined to his apartment and a wheelchair, amusing himself by watching his neighbors. Then he begins to suspect that one of them committed murder.  Hitchcock uses this story to examine voyeurism, urban alienation, and the institution of marriage, and to treat his audience to a great, suspenseful entertainment.  Dial M—the only 3D film made by an important director until Avatar–isn’t great Hitchcock, but it’s passable. Unfortunately, the Castro will not present the movie in 3D.

A Psycho, Castro, Wednesday. Contrary to urban myth, Alfred Hitchcock didn’t really want people to stop taking showers. He was, however, inspired by the television show he was then producing to make a low-budget movie in black and white.

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